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Cape Coral finding new ways to explain upcoming fertilizer ordinance

jbrotton

REPORTER: ZACH OLIVERI WRITER: MATTHEW SEAVER PUBLISHED: MAY 25, 2022 3:50 PM EDT CAPE CORAL Preventing harm to our waterways is the goal of Cape Coral’s fertilizer ordinance. You can’t use any fertilizer with nitrogen or phosphorus on your lawn.

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Caring for our lawn and the environment together

jbrotton

Tom Infanti Submitted​ May 26, 2022 The American lawn has been a sense of pride and commitment to many, and has a long history going back over 200 years. The care of our lawn continues to evolve as we learn more about the science behind it. We also continue to learn how our lawns affect the environment around us. Below are some interesting lawn history facts and some suggestions on how we can make lawn care coexist with the environment we need to protect. 1700s: Landscape designers in England...

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Summer Fertilizer Ban Starts June 1

jbrotton

Maria Lamb 5/18/2022 Editor's Note:  According to the March Marco Island Police Department Report, three landscaping companies fertilizing without a permit received education and information regarding the permitting requirements. Monday, June 1 is the beginning of the summertime fertilizer blackout. Per Marco’s Fertilizer Ordinance No. 16-02, during this period (June 1 – September 30), you cannot apply any fertilizer containing nitrogen or phosphorus to your lawn.

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Environmental Mystery - Thousands of Fish Die in Third River

jbrotton

Montclair-area environmental activists and state officials are trying to figure out the cause of a May 10 fish die-off in the Third River, which the activists describe as having a “devastating impact” on the local waterway.  “We had a severe die-off, where what we believe is the entire population of fish in the river just suddenly turned up dead,” Jonathan Grupper, member of Friends of the Bonsal Preserve, said.   “Part of what was really tragic about that was realizing how many species of fish...

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Save the seagrass, lagoons and manatees

jbrotton

Orlando Sentinel Editorial Board Published 5:02 a.m. ET May 19, 2022 In recent months those fighting to save Florida’s beloved manatees have done things they never thought they’d do — and this month’s decision to sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is just the latest example. Manatee experts, state workers and volunteers have rescued hundreds of emaciated, sick manatees whose main food source — seagrass — has been dying at a terrifying rate. Many will need months of labor-intensive...

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Draft impaired waters list may not reflect nutrient burden

jbrotton

05/17/2022 by Jenna Seagle The lower Neuse River is known for many things, including sportfishing and magnificent and serene views from homesites, campgrounds and parks, but increasingly often during this time of year, a foul stench begins arising from its waters. Harmful algal blooms and fish kills can affect recreation, business and property values, and create unsafe and undesirable environmental effects.

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Climate Change, Drought, Demographics Changing Way Lawn Care is Approached

jbrotton

By Cynthia Drummond / ecoRI News contributor April 25, 2022 RICHMOND, R.I. — Love them or hate them, lawns aren’t going to disappear from the New England landscape anytime soon. Caring for those islands of green can be as casual as an occasional mowing, or as involved as season-long programs that include watering, adding nutrients and eliminating weeds and insect pests.

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A surprising climate change contributor: retention ponds that reduce flooding

jbrotton

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – New research out of the University of Florida suggests that stormwater ponds, specifically permanently wet retention ponds, are a significant source of climate change-causing greenhouse gas emissions.

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Contaminated water from Florida mining facility dumped a year's worth of hazardous nutrients into Tampa Bay in just 10 days, study shows

jbrotton

BY LI COHEN APRIL 25, 2022 / 11:02 AM / CBS NEWS All it took was 10 days to devastate the waters of Tampa Bay for months. The nearly "catastrophic failure" of Piney Point, a former phosphate mining facility, unleashed millions of gallons of untreated wastewater into local waterways, and new research, published on the anniversary the leak at the facility began, reveals just how devastating it was. 

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Brandon Shuler: Wastewater fuels harmful algal blooms

jbrotton

We must prioritize wastewater treatment to reduce the frequency and toxicity of harmful algal blooms.

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