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9 lawn-care mistakes every first-time homeowner makes (and how to avoid them)

BY: JOSH SENS JANUARY 22, 2021 Your first time can be nerve-racking, rife with anxious buildup. You want it to be fun, safe, productive and long-lasting. You worry you’ll be judged. You’re keen to get it right.

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Planting shrubs in your landscape

Jim Coe Correspondent​    Jan 21, 2021      Updated 17 hrs ago Since shrubs are a permanent part of the landscape, homeowners need to know the proper planting technique to give shrubs a healthy start. Shrubs are sold in three basic ways; container-grown, balled and burlapped and bare-rooted. Each has its own purpose, cost and transplant abilities. Choice the best packaging that fits your budget, availabilities and how the plant fits in the landscape plan.

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Human-caused ‘dead zones’ threaten health of Puget Sound

Wastewater treatment plants account for about 70% of the excess nutrients.

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Human-caused ‘dead zones’ threaten health of Puget Sound

Wastewater treatment plants account for about 70% of the excess nutrients.

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One-third of US rivers have changed color since 1984, a study found, many due to algae blooms

Seth Borenstein, Associated Press  Jan 8, 2021, 11:58 AM An algae bloom appears on the Caloosahatchee River in Alva, Florida on July 12, 2018. AP Photo/Lynne Sladky America's rivers are changing color — and people are behind many of the shifts, a new study said.

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Groups Look to New Administration to Clean Up Ohio River

January 15, 2021 COLUMBUS, Ohio - Groups that advocate for water quality are urging the incoming Biden administration to meet the goals of the Clean Water Act, which means reducing what's known as nutrient pollution in the Ohio River. After the last four years of federal water regulation rollbacks, ten plus groups filed a petition asking the Environmental Protection Agency and Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission - or ORSANCO - to take immediate steps.

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Insects are vanishing at an alarming rate—but we can save them

Insects aren’t just pests. They’re crucial for the planet and our food supply, and scientists say we can all pitch in to help.

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Move over, murder hornets: There’s a new bug in town — and it’s coming for your lawn

Jan. 10, 2021 at 6:00 am Updated Jan. 11, 2021 at 7:59 am By Sandi Doughton Seattle Times staff reporter By 9 o’clock on a frosty morning, crows were already rototilling a baseball field in Seattle’s Delridge neighborhood. Prowling in groups of three and four, the glossy birds yanked up clumps of grass and poked through the exposed clods. Gulls circled overhead but didn’t land — yet.

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South Portland bans synthetic fertilizers

The ban, geared toward protecting the waters of Casco Bay, is part of new changes to the city's pesticide ordinance. BY SEAN MURPHY THE FORECASTER SOUTH PORTLAND — The South Portland City Council approved a new ban on synthetic fertilizers citywide last week, mirroring similar language already spelled out regarding use of pesticides. Sustainability Director Julie Rosenbach said this week that the new ban, effective Dec. 7, will “move the city toward organic land care practices.”

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We know how to manage stormwater runoff into the Indian River Lagoon. Let's implement it | Opinion

Written By: Dave Botto The Indian River Lagoon is one of the most valuable coastal wildlife habitats in Florida. It is an estuary of national significance and has been internationally featured as one of the most diverse estuaries in North America.

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