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Opinion: We need to figure out what’s happening to the bugs — before it’s too late

jbrotton

Opinion by John Terborgh and David S. Wilcove  Today at 1:57 p.m. EDT John Terborgh is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science at Duke University. David S. Wilcove is Professor of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs at Princeton University.

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You're mowing your yard wrong. Here are 3 ways to keep your lawn healthy

jbrotton

Paul Cappiello     Yew Dell Botanical Gardens Published 5:06 am ET Jul. 16, 2021 It has always been surprising to me that despite the fact that the cultivated lawn is a purely human invention, we should have such a tortured and painful relationship with our turf.

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Ditching grass could help your backyard thrive

jbrotton

Lawns are ecological ‘dead space.’ Experts explain how to design a more eco-friendly yard.

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Special Water Quality Alert Asks Residents To Eliminate Fertilizers

jbrotton

By RYAN SPENCER Town Manager Rodney C. Collins sent a “special water quality alert” to property owners in Mashpee late last week outlining how eliminating the use of fertilizer can reduce nutrient pollution and blooms of harmful algae. The Mashpee Board of Selectmen during its meeting on June 28 authorized the letter from the town manager after a presentation on blooms of potentially toxic cyanobacteria that closed Mashpee/Wakeby Pond and Santuit Pond to swimming earlier this summer.

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Healthy lawns for a healthy Niantic River and Long Island Sound

jbrotton

Published June 24. 2021 9:00AM  By Judy Rondeau, Special to the Times This summer, the Niantic River Watershed Committee is asking residents of East Lyme and Waterford to think about how they use lawn fertilizer. Through the Healthy Lawns, Healthy River project, funded through the Long Island Sound Futures Fund program, volunteers from the Watershed Committee will visit neighborhoods along the Niantic River to ask residents to consider how much fertilizer they apply on their lawns and how they...

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Tips for keeping lawns green

jbrotton

By Mark Amara, WSU Grant-Adams Master Gardener| June 20, 2021 1:00 AM Lawns in the Columbia Basin can stay green despite the hot weather. Whether we think about them or not, lawns depend on soil type, weather, and timing, length of watering and irrigation system output. Most of our Grant County soils are sandy loams and silt loams and do not need to be watered as often as soils that consist entirely of sand (though some of us have that, too).

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Healthy lawns for a healthy Niantic River and Long Island Sound

jbrotton

Published June 24. 2021 9:00AM  By Judy Rondeau, Special to the Times This summer, the Niantic River Watershed Committee is asking residents of East Lyme and Waterford to think about how they use lawn fertilizer. Through the Healthy Lawns, Healthy River project, funded through the Long Island Sound Futures Fund program, volunteers from the Watershed Committee will visit neighborhoods along the Niantic River to ask residents to consider how much fertilizer they apply on their lawns and how they...

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3 years ago, a massive algae bloom in Florida killed 2,000 tons of marine life. It's threatening again

jbrotton

By Arthur Brice, CNN  Updated 10:05 AM ET, Fri June 4, 2021 Blue green algae, which are toxic, have been blooming the past few weeks in the waters around Tampa Bay. (CNN) It's not just tourists who invade Florida in the summer.

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Here's what you should know about Milorganite and a recent study showing it may contain 'forever chemicals'

jbrotton

Laura Schulte Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Published 9:00 am CT Jun. 7, 2021 A recent study by environmental groups found that you may be unknowingly spreading "forever chemicals" on your lawn and garden in the form of fertilizer.  And that sounds scary, especially because one of the fertilizers tested was Milwaukee's own famed Milorganite. 

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PFAS Found in Widely Used Home Garden Fertilizers

jbrotton

E.A. Crunden, E&E News reporter  Published: Tuesday, May 25, 2021 "Forever chemicals" have made their way into widely available fertilizers used in home gardens, according to a new study out today that warns of stark implications for human health.

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